Spirulina Face and Body Mask How-to and Review


This is a review on using the algae ‘spirulina’ as a topical treatment for acne, redness and to reduce pore size. Included also are the recipes and techniques I used while doing the treatments.

Author with Spirulina Mask

Author with Spirulina Mask

This recipe I am using is simple and requires only two ingredients; spirulina and carrot juice.

Mix enough spirulina powder with carrot juice to make a runny paste. The paste should be the consistency of melted chocolate.

Apply this mixture to a clean face and allow it to dry for at least twenty minutes. Wash off with cool water and pat your face dry.

…Read More

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Growing Stevia Rebaudiana


Stevia Bloom

Stevia Bloom

The stevia plant (Stevia rebaudiana) has a long history of use as a natural, no calorie sweetener. Read More about Stevia Plants …Stevia Care


Just as with many of my Frugal Gardening Momma articles, more in depth work will be found in my upcoming book. Keep a check on my site for updates!

The stevia plant (Stevia rebaudiana) has a long history of use as a natural, no calorie sweetener. Stevia is native to the lands of North and South America most notably, Argentina, Paraguay and Brazil. With a genus of roughly 240 species, the more common S. rebaudiana is one species in a large plant family.

Its growing requirements are simple as it is an undemanding plant that is not often attacked by pests or diseases. The leaves, stems, roots and blossoms of the stevia plant can be used as sugar substitutes—though the parts of the leaf between each vein is thought to be superior as a sweetener with little to no aftertaste.

Place stevia in full sun with well-drained soils that contain a lot of organic matter. The key is to keep the soil moist until the plant is well established. Once established, stevia is drought tolerant–though it grows better if given plenty of water.

Fertilize stevia plants with organic foods such as worm castings, tea and coffee grounds, cow and chicken manure, and compost teas. Avoid the use of synthetic fertilizers whenever possible. Pinch the growing tips of each branch to promote a bushier habit and more sweet-tasting leaves. USDA zone 11—or 32 degrees fahrenheit.

Bachelor’s Button and Catnip Tea


Bachelor’s Button and Catnip Tea

This colorful tea has the slight flavor of green tea with a light minty aftertaste. Catnip does not taste like it smells so for those who avoid it because of that fear, your worries are unfounded. The relaxing, sedative effects of my organic catnip tea are stronger than that of any chamomile I have tried. This recipe is easy to adjust. Try adding your own herbs or omitting those I have used.


Fresh Bachelor's Button Catnip Tea in Cup

Use either dried or fresh herbs for this recipe.

  • 1-2 Tablespoon/s Catnip Leaves and Blossoms
  • 1/2-Tablespoon Bachelor’s Buttons Leaves
  • Four Large Bachelor’s Buttons Blossoms
  • One Stevia Leaf

Pour hot, not boiling, water over the herbs. Cover with a non-porous lid and allow the tea to steep for 15 minutes. Some of the oils from the catnip leaves will collect on the lid. I lick this off before enjoying my tea. Waste not.
This recipe makes one eight-ounce cup of tea.

 

Use either dried or fresh herbs for this recipe.

 

1-2 Tablespoon/s Catnip Leaves

½-Tablespoon Bachelor’s Buttons Leaves

Four Large Bachelor’s Buttons Blossoms

One Stevia Leaf

Pour hot, not boiling, water over the herbs. Cover with a non-porous lid and allow the tea to steep for 15 minutes. Some of the oils from the catnip leaves will collect on the lid. I lick this off before enjoying my tea. Waste not. J

This recipe makes one eight-ounce cup of tea.

How to Grow Hardy Hibiscus


Out of the three types of hibiscus that gardeners normally choose for their landscaping, the hardy hibiscus (Hibiscus acetosella) has gained popularity for its ability to stand colder temperatures while offering a tropical feel to more northern gardening.

Hardy Hibiscus

With blooms measuring up to the size of dinner plates it is little wonder why hibiscus enthralls its followers so deeply. This tropical looking plant is like the pied piper of the flower world and a real show-stopper at that.

The Right Soil for Hardy Hibiscus

Hardy hibiscus requires well-drained soil and plenty of moisture during its active growing season. Dig a hole twice as deep and wide as the root ball and backfill with rich organic compost. Hibiscuses are heavy feeders and require plenty of food while growing to ensure they have ample reserves for this and next year’s blooms. A fertilizer of 150-200ppm Nitrogen will help the plants grow vigorously and ensure good bloom set.

Read More …How to Grow Hardy Hibiscus: Growing Hibiscus Acetosella